Women of Kessounou

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Kessounou is a village located in the Dangbo town in the Republic of Benin, often affected by floods during rainy season, thus causing several health and social issues. At the heart of this community, women have a sacred role in the local economy and the development of the village. Through their activities, they are able to meet their own needs and those of their children, allowing them to have a decent living standard and access to education despite the many challenges of their environment.

Auntie Diane lives in Dangbo. A few years ago, she started a food selling business. This activity allowed her to generate income to send her children to school. Despite her husband’s job, they failed to ensure the education of their children. However, it is important for her that her children attend school. With the “tontine” system, she was able to collect the money necessary to launch her small business that already bears fruit.
“Auntie Diane” lives in Dangbo. A few years ago, she started a food selling business. This activity allowed her to generate income to send her children to school. Despite her husband’s job, they failed to ensure the education of their children. However, it is important for her that her children attend school. With the “tontine” system, she was able to collect the money necessary to launch her small business that already bears fruit.
As we have seen previously, women are not only at the heart of Kessounou’s economy but they are heading it. The woman in this picture is affectionately called “Mama”. All women rely on her for advice on the village life and their business management. They call her the economic “guardian” of the city. Everyone calls her when there is need of an elder. Her goal is to leave a healthy environment to these women so that they can continue developing their village.  She explains that the women of Kessounou are the future of their village and have part of Benin’s future in their hands. True warriors, who care as much for the wellbeing of their families, as the growth of their community.
As we have seen previously, women are not only at the heart of Kessounou’s economy but they are heading it. The woman in this picture is affectionately called “Mama”. All women rely on her for advice on the village life and their business management. They call her the economic “guardian” of the city. Everyone calls her when there is need of an elder. Her goal is to leave a healthy environment to these women so that they can continue developing their village. She explains that the women of Kessounou are the future of their village and have part of Benin’s future in their hands. True warriors, who care as much for the wellbeing of their families, as the growth of their community.
The woman above lives in Dangbo. Her husband owns a plantation where he sows various foods. They have three children. During the day, she helps her husband plow the field, and in the evening she sells some of the crops at the market. For now, the revenue from the sales is set aside in order to send the children to school soon. She wants her children to succeed and knows that success will be achieved through education.
The woman above lives in Dangbo. Her husband owns a plantation where he sows various foods. They have three children. During the day, she helps her husband plow the field, and in the evening she sells some of the crops at the market. For now, the revenue from the sales is set aside in order to send the children to school soon. She wants her children to succeed and knows that success will be achieved through education.
Ariane Nancy Agbo

the author

Ariane Nancy Agbo

Ariane Nancy AGBO is a bachelor student in History and Law at the University of Sorbonne in Paris. She is also part of the Unicef antenna of her university. Since 2015, she works for UNDP Benin where she is responsible for mission in the women empowerment department in rural areas of Benin. In February 2016, she was hired by the Kofi Annan Foundation to work as an analyst on agriculture development and poverty reduction in Africa.

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